Leadership · Rick Warren

LEADERSHIP: Your Mission: Help Others Get into God’s Family

leadership

“In the same way that you gave me a mission in the world, I give them a mission in the world.” (John 17:18 MSG)

If you are a follower of Jesus Christ, God has given you a mission in this world. You’re not here to just take up space; you’re not here to just strive after your own personal goals.

You have an assignment from God himself. Once you’re in the family, your life changes. You have a new reason for living. Your life isn’t about you anymore; it’s about God’s mission.

And your mission fits into God’s mission for all of history. God created everything in the universe because he wanted a family. He didn’t need Earth. He didn’t need the other planets. He didn’t need the stars. He created all of it because he knew some of us would willingly choose to be a part of his family.

The mission God gave Jesus he now gives to the Body of Christ — the Church. He wants us to help get other people into his family. Jesus said it like this: “In the same way that you gave me a mission in the world, I give them a mission in the world” (John 17:18 MSG).

Once we know Jesus, we have to go! We must tell our friends and families about him. But we can’t stop there. God has never made anyone he doesn’t want saved. He loves everyone — across the entire globe.

God wants us to live out his mission everywhere: in our families, our communities, and our world. His mission for your life is both global and local. The Bible says, “Now the Lord says to me, ‘It isn’t enough for you to be merely my servant. You must do more than lead back survivors from the tribes of Israel. I have placed you here as a light for other nations; you must take my saving power to everyone on earth’” (Isaiah 49:6 CEV).

That’s God’s plan for the world. That’s his mission for you. He wants everyone on Earth to know him. And he wants to use you to see that happen. God didn’t just say that to missionaries or pastors. If you’re in his family, he gave his mission to you!

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Be blessed,

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(Source: Rick Warren)

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John Maxwell · Leadership

LEADERSHIP: PORTRAIT OF A GODLY LEADER

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“Lord, who may abide in Your tabernacle? Who may dwell in Your holy hill? He who walks uprightly, and works righteousness, and speaks the truth in his heart; He who does not backbite with his tongue, nor does evil to his neighbor, nor does he take up a reproach against his friend; in whose eyes a vile person is despised, but he honors those who fear the Lord; he who swears to his own hurt and does not change; he who does not put out his money at usury, nor does he take a bribe against the innocent. He who does these things shall never be moved.” Psalm 15:1-5

What qualities should every leader possess? Psalm 15 furnishes us with a list of many of the necessary traits. David pictures a godly leader as one who:

  • Possesses integrity
  • Does not participate in gossip
  • Does not harm others
  • Speaks out against wrong
  • Honors others who walk in truth
  • Keeps their word even at personal cost
  • Isn’t greedy to gain at the expense of others
  • Is strong and stable

 

Be blessed,

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(Source: John Maxwell)

John Maxwell · Leadership

LEADERSHIP: CLOSE TO THE HEART OF GOD

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“Draw near to God and He will draw near to you.”  James 4:8

When Samuel first heard God’s voice, he was “in the tabernacle of the Lord where the ark of God was” (1 Samuel 3:3). That was a good place to be, because that location was as close to the presence of God as a person could be in those days-unless, of course, he were the high priest who entered the Holy of Holies once a year.

Close to God is where every leader belongs. That doesn’t mean you have to be in a place of formal worship; it just means you need to have an attitude of worship wherever you are. It’s a posture of the heart.

That’s a lesson I learned while in college and then took into the ministry. When I was attending Circleville Bible College, I used to go out to a deserted house after my classes and spend time with God every afternoon. It became my special place to connect with Him. Since then, I’ve always had a special place I visit to listen to God.

If you want to become the kind of person that others listen to, then get better acquainted with God. Connect with Him on a consistent basis, and you will greatly increase the likelihood that you will connect with others.

Be blessed,

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(Source: John Maxwell)

John Maxwell · Leadership

LEADERSHIP: CLOSER THAN A BROTHER

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But He answered and said to the one who told Him, “Who is My mother and who are My brothers?” And He stretched out His hand toward His disciples and said, “Here are My mother and My brothers!”  Matthew 12:48-49

When you’re looking for potential leaders, if someone you’re considering lacks loyalty, he’s disqualified. Don’t even consider taking him on the journey with you because in the end, he’ll hurt you more than help you. So what does it mean for others to be loyal to you?

  1. They love you unconditionally – They accept you with your strengths and weaknesses intact. They care for you, but don’t put you on a pedestal.
  2. They represent you well to others – Loyal people may take you to task privately or hold you accountable, but they never criticize you to others.
  3. They are able to laugh and cry with you as you travel together – This makes the trip less lonely.
  4. They make your dream, their dream – Some people will share the journey with you only briefly. But a few, a special few, will want to come alongside you and help you for the rest of the way.

When people combine loyalty with other talents and abilities, they can be some of your greatest assets. If you find people like that, take good care of them.

Be blessed,

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(Source: John Maxwell)

John Maxwell · Leadership

LEADERSHIP: REPENTANCE BRINGS REWARD

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“Then Job answered the Lord and said: ‘Behold, I am vile; What shall I answer You? I lay my hand over my mouth. Once I have spoken, but I will not answer; Yes, twice, but I will proceed no further’.”  Job 40:3-5

When God confronted Job with His power and majesty, Job responded with absolute humility. The chastened man didn’t try to defend himself or rationalize his feelings. He confessed his humanity, then shut his mouth. Even after Job acknowledged his insignificance and presumption, God delivered a second speech, graphically describing His power to control everything. God said He glories in the might of behemoth and the ferocity of leviathan, and asked Job if he dare go near either one. This time Job responded with deep repentance, clearly marking the difference between his friends and him.

Good leaders feel secure enough to repent when wrong. They don’t have to project their self-worth, defend their every move, or make excuses for their failures. In the end, God rebuked Job’s friends and rewarded Job–but not until the end.

Be blessed,

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(Source: John Maxwell)

John Maxwell · Leadership

LEADERSHIP: ANOINTED TO LEAD

leadership

“Now it was so, when Moses came down from Mount Sinai (and the two tablets of the Testimony were in Moses’ hand when he came down form the mountain), that Moses did not know that the skin of his face shone while he talked with Him . . . Afterward all the children of Israel came near, and he gave them as commandments all that the Lord had spoken with him on Mount Sinai.”  Exodus 34:29, 32

When Moses brought down the commandments, his face shone with the glory of God. The nature and character of God had begun to rub off on Moses, and the glory took such a tangible form that he had to wear a veil over his face. The Israelites sensed both God’s presence in Moses’ leadership and a divine anointing to lead. Do others describe your leadership as “anointed”? What does it mean to be anointed? Here’s one way to break it down. Anointed leadership is characterized by:

  1. Charisma – The anointed enjoy a sense of giftedness that comes from God. It seems magnetic.
  2. Character – People see God’s nature in your leadership. They trust you.
  3. Competence – You have the ability to get the job done. Your leadership produces results.
  4. Conviction – Your leadership has backbone. You always stand for what is right.

Be blessed,

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(Source: John Maxwell)

John Maxwell · Leadership

LEADERSHIP: EVALUATE, THEN EMPOWER

“If anyone wants to provide leadership in the church, good! But there are preconditions.”  1 Timothy 3:1 (The Message)

The place to start empowering people is by evaluating them. With inexperienced people, if you give them too much authority too soon, you can be setting them up to fail. With people who have lots of experience, if you move too slowly you can frustrate and demoralize them.

Sometimes when leaders misjudge the capabilities of others the results can be comical. For example, in 1898, Albert Einstein applied for admittance to the Munich Technical Institute and was rejected because he would “never amount to much.” As a result, instead of going to school, he worked as an inspector at the Swiss Patent Office and with his extra time he refined his theory of relativity.

Remember that everyone has the potential to succeed. Your job is to see the potential, find out what he lacks, and equip him with what he needs. As you evaluate the people you intend to empower, look first at three areas:

  1. Knowledge – Think about what people need to know in order to do anything you intend to give them.
  2. Skill – Nothing is more frustrating than being asked to do things for which you have no ability.
  3. Desire – No amount of skill, knowledge, or potential can help a person succeed if he doesn’t have the desire to be successful.

Be blessed,

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(Source: John Maxwell)

John Maxwell · Leadership

LEADERSHIP: GIVE YOUR ALL

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“Thus Jehu destroyed Baal from Israel. However Jehu did not turn away from the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, who had made Israel sin, that is, from the golden calves that were at Bethel and Dan.” 2 Kings 10:28-29

Call him a man with a mission. Jehu not only accepted a charge from God to lead Israel as king, he also embraced divine instructions to destroy the house of Ahab and the worship of Baal. God told him not to spare anyone from Ahab’s family and to eliminate all traces of Baal worship in Israel. Jehu led brilliantly in fulfilling God’s commands, and God commended Jehu for carrying out his mission, even promising him great blessing because of his obedience.

But a problem eventually arose. While Jehu obeyed God to the last detail concerning the destruction of Ahab and the worship of Baal, he compromised his devotion to God by leaving intact some idols from Israel’s past. Even after such great success, “Jehu took no heed to walk in the law of the Lord God of Israel with all his heart.”

Jehu accomplished great things for the Lord and the kingdom of Israel, but his compromise led to another vile form of idolatry. In the end, his disobedience overshadowed his accomplishments as a leader.

Be blessed,

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(Source: John Maxwell)

John Maxwell · Leadership

LEADERSHIP: ABUSE OF POWER

leadership

“And he wrote in the letter, saying, ‘Set Uriah in the forefront of the hottest battle, and retreat from him, that he may be struck down and die’.”  2 Samuel 11:15

Pittacus wrote, “The measure of a man is what he does with power.” Second Samuel 11 tells the story of a king who forgot that leaders wield power for one reason only – to serve. Consider the “Path to Abusive Power” in leaders:

Stage One: Surprise – “I get this?”
Stage Two: Self-Esteem – “I need this.”
Stage Three: Satisfaction – “I deserve this.”
Stage Four: Selfishness – “I demand this.”

By watching King David weave a tangled web following his sin with Bathsheba, we notice five common abuses of power that still trip up leaders today. Calvin Miller describes them this way:

  1. Drifting away from those disciplines we still demand of our people.
  2. Believing that others owe us whatever use we can make of them.
  3. Attempting to fix things up rather than make things right.
  4. Refusing to accept that we could be blindly out of God’s will.
  5. Believing that people in our way are expendable.

Be blessed,

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(Source: John Maxwell)

John Maxwell · Leadership

LEADERSHIP: THREE QUESTIONS FOR CHRISTIAN LEADERS

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By the rivers of Babylon, There we sat down, yea, we wept when we remembered Zion. We hung our harps upon the willows in the midst of it. For there, those who carried us away captive asked of us a song. And those who plundered us requested mirth. Saying, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!” How shall we sing the Lord’s song in a foreign land? If I forget you, O Jerusalem, Let my right hand forget its skill! If I do not remember you, Let my tongue cling to the roof of my mouth – If I do not exalt Jerusalem above my chief joy. ”  Psalm 137:1-6

Three great issues erupt from the lyrics of this psalm: the writer dreams, the writer cries, and the writer sings. No wonder the people wept – the Jews had been exiled to Babylon. No wonder they sang – they could not forget Zion, the land of their birth. No wonder they dreamed – they hoped and prayed for the day of their return home.

These issues pose great questions for every leader:

What do you dream about? What would you do if you had no fear of failure?
What do you cry about? What burdens drive you to become passionate?
What do you sing about? What causes you to rejoice?

Be blessed,

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(Source: John Maxwell)